Maurizio Sarri warned of ‘inevitable problems’ at Juventus

New Juventus boss Maurizio Sarri will “inevitably run into problems” while imposing his style of play on the squad, says Arrigo Sacchi.

Across his 29 years of coaching, Sarri has deployed an attractive brand of attacking football at clubs. The most prominent example of this was during his three seasons at hometown side Napoli in the Serie A.

Manchester City boss Pep Guardiola, in fact, was so impressed he once described Sarri’s style as “the most beautiful football in Europe” during a Champions League group-stage encounter in 2017. The Catalan even went as far as declaring Napoli as “probably the best side [I’ve] ever faced”.

Therefore, Sarri is a completely different kind of coach to what Juventus previously had under Massimiliano Allegri and Antonio Conte.

During his first interview for the Bianconeri, the 60-year-old revealed plans to change the style of play “a bit”. However, he also intends to keep “99 per cent of [the] good things” present.

But Sacchi, who is a long-term admirer of Sarri’s, warned the former Chelsea manager that it won’t be easy to make changes in Turin.

“Sarri will inevitably run into problems, because he is proposing new ideas and novelty is not always accepted by players,” the ex-AC Milan boss told La Gazzetta dello Sport.

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“The club will have the job and the duty to support their coach, exactly the same way Silvio Berlusconi did with me in the 1980s when I first arrived.

“In any case, I believe president Andrea Agnelli has made a wonderful move by hiring Sarri. He has sparked a genuine revolution that can work to the advantage of all Italian football. It’s a cultural step up and not a small one, either.

“If you hire Sarri, it means you want to win, but you also want to do it via beautiful football, spectacle and emotions.”

There have been doubts in Italy, though, on how Sarri will fit in at Juventus given his reputation as a “stubborn and single-minded coach”.

“He is not a great communicator. Let’s just say he does his talking on the pitch,” admitted Sacchi.

“However, although he’s not that chatty, Sarri is still a good man, honest and who says what he thinks to your face.

“If Agnelli and everyone in the club are fully convinced, Juve could entertain everyone for a long time to come.”

FLORENCE, ITALY – MARCH 23: Italian Football Youth Coordinator Arrigo Sacchi during a training session ahead of their EURO 2012 qualifier against Slovenia at Coverciano on March 23, 2011 in Florence, Italy. (Photo by Claudio Villa/Getty Images)

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